Advices About Maintenance


After use it, or if you are going to store it for a long time, the carbon steel blade, must be cleaned, dried and lubricated with a silicone lubricant, or alternatively, a little mineral oil of good quality, being careful not to get the blade soaked. Ideally, after lubricating, wrap the knife in PVC film (used in the kitchen).

If the blade is chemically coated with iron perchlorate, it has an increased resistance to oxidation and you can follow the advice above, but taking care to apply only a thin layer of oil.

Regularly check the blade and try to detect if there are spots of rust (red areas). If yes, immediately clean the area, with an appropriate product before it spreads.

The darkening or oxidation of the steel blades is a natural process and can hardly be avoided. This is also a protection against rust. Oxidation benign features blue-gray tones, while the malignant oxidation (rust) has red or brownish tones.
The handle also must be given special care and maintenance, given the material they are made of.
Do the same with the sheath.

All leather sheaths supplied with the knives are treated (both in and out), but nevertheless take into account the following:
When not being used, all knives with leather sheaths should be stored outside the sheath. The leather absorbs moisture and will accelerate the oxidation process of the blade and create conditions conducive to corrosion. The chemical treatment of the leather itself can cause premature rusting of the blade.
Store your knife in an environment with the least possible moisture and with a stable and not too high temperature.

Taking such care any blade can be maintained in good condition and free of rust.

A sharp blade is a safe blade. If the blade is properly sharpened will be needed less force on the cutting action, and consequently there is less risk of having a knife accident.

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